On February 27, 2024, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that certain Ukrainian citizens and their immediate family members who were paroled into the United States may now begin applying for re-parole, either online or by mail. USCIS will consider these applications on a discretionary, case-by-case basis for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit. If USCIS approves the application, a new period of humanitarian parole (also known as “re-parole”) will be granted for up to 2 years after the expiration of the initial parole period.

Eligible applicants are encouraged to submit Form I-131 for re-parole, along with the required documents and filing fees, through their USCIS accounts online. This can save time and reduce errors commonly found on paper-filed forms that can lead to delays. Once approved for re-parole, Ukrainians can then apply for an initial or renewal Employment Authorization Document with USCIS.

Learn more about who is eligible, when to apply, what documents are required, procedures for adults and minors, how to renew employment authorization, and other important details below.

What Is Humanitarian Parole?

Humanitarian parole is an entry granted to certain non-citizens due to a compelling emergency or urgent humanitarian reasons who would otherwise be ineligible for admission to the U.S. A person can also apply for one-time entry for a specific purpose, such as obtaining medical treatment, visiting an ill family member, attending a family member’s funeral, or testifying in a U.S. court case.

Humanitarian parole allows a person to temporarily live in the U.S. without fear of deportation. However, it is important to understand that humanitarian parole does not give a person an immigration status. Since humanitarian parole is not a legal status, a person who is in the U.S. on humanitarian parole will either need to reapply for another term of parole before their current term expires, select a different legal status for which to apply, or leave the U.S.

Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in 2022, the secretary of homeland security exercised his discretionary authority to allow certain Ukrainians to seek temporary parole in the United States, as well as apply for work authorization. The extraordinary circumstances in Ukraine that supported the prior exercise of discretionary parole authority continue to exist. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has continued and has resulted in tremendous civilian casualties. USCIS will take these current extraordinary circumstances into account on a case-by-case basis in evaluating requests for re-parole.

Who Is Eligible to Apply for Re-Parole?

To be eligible for re-parole under this process, you must demonstrate all of the following:

  • That you are a Ukrainian citizen or their immediate family member who was paroled into the United States on or after February 11, 2022 through one of the following processes:
    • Paroled as a beneficiary through Uniting for Ukraine
    • Initially paroled into the United States with a DT class of admission after Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine and before the Uniting for Ukraine process became available
    • Re-paroled into the United States with a DA class of admission following advance parole travel abroad.
  • That there are continued urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit for you to be issued a new period of humanitarian parole. These include the urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit factors identified above, as well as any additional factors that may apply to you personally. USCIS has published guidance explaining some types of factors that might be considered in assessing whether humanitarian parole is “merited” for a particular applicant.
  • That you warrant a favorable exercise of discretion (i.e. a new period of parole that would allow you to remain in the United States). It may be useful to provide some compelling facts about your unique circumstances that explain why you need to remain in the United States. Examples include but are not limited to remaining united with family members, receiving necessary medical treatment or health services, loss of a home or safe shelter in Ukraine, elevated risk of harm in Ukraine due to personal characteristics, and maintaining safety for children or disabled family members.
  • That you are physically present in the United States.
  • That you have complied with the conditions of your initial parole, including completing the health requirements for parolees, registering for the Selective Service System (males ages 18-25), and updating their address with USCIS each time they moved
  • That you clear biographic and biometric background checks

Does Each Person in the Family Need to Apply for Re-Parole Separately?

Yes, each individual must file their own re-parole application under this process, regardless of age. To file online as a self-petitioner, each applicant must have their own unique email address and USCIS online account. A parent or legal guardian may create an account for their minor child if they need to submit a form on behalf of the minor.

A parent or legal guardian may complete a re-parole application for a minor under 14 years old by signing for the minor and providing evidence of the legal relationship, such as a birth certificate. A legal guardian may also sign on behalf of a mentally incompetent person of any age. If you sign for a child as their parent or legal guardian, you should sign your own name, with a notation that you are signing “for” or “on behalf of” the child. You should also include the child’s name. If a parent signs for a minor child, the parent must submit a birth certificate or adoption decree to establish the parent-child relationship

Minors may also complete the application on their own behalf, without a parent or legal guardian signing for them. Children over the age of 14 should generally sign for themselves, if they are able to do so.

USCIS will require documentation to establish a legal guardian’s authority to sign a benefit request on behalf of a child or mentally incompetent requestor. Acceptable documentation includes, but is not limited to, official letters of guardianship or other orders issued by a court or government agency legally authorized to make such appointment under the law governing the place where the child or incapacitated requestor resides.

Can Ukrainians Apply for Re-Parole through this Process from Outside of the United States?

In order to apply for re-parole under this process, applicants must be located inside the United States. To learn how individuals outside of the United States may be able to apply for parole into the United States, visit the USCIS page on humanitarian parole.

When Can Eligible Ukrainians Apply for Re-Parole, and How Long will the New Parole Period Last?

Eligible Ukrainian citizens and their immediate family members may begin applying to USCIS for re-parole on February 27, 2024. It is important that you file your application for re-parole before the end of your initial parole period. If circumstances allow, USCIS recommends filing your application for re-parole no later than 60 days before the last day of your initial parole period. You can find your initial date of parole on your Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record, issued by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

If USCIS approves the application for re-parole, a new period of humanitarian parole will be granted for up to 2 years after the expiration of the initial parole period.

Please note: After your initial parole expires, you are no longer in a period of stay authorized unless you have been granted an immigration status (such as asylum or TPS) or if you are authorized to remain in the U.S. while you have a pending asylum, TPS, or Green Card application. Hence, USCIS encourages parolees to file their re-parole applications as soon as possible.

Which Documents Are Required to Apply for Re-Parole?

The following documents are required to apply for re-parole:


1) You must use Form I-131 to request re-parole. You can submit Form I-131, Application for Travel Document online or by mail (on paper). You do not need to file Form I-134, Declaration of Financial Support, or Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support, as a supporter is not required for re-parole.
2) Regardless of whether you apply for re-parole online or on paper by mail, you must provide documentation to confirm your initial period of parole and identity, including your photo, name, and date of birth. Examples include:

  • Form I-94 (can be obtained on the CBP website)
  • A copy of both sides of your USCIS-issued Employment Authorization Document (EAD), if you applied for and received one
  • A copy of both sides of your U.S. government-issued driver’s license or U.S. government- issued ID, if you applied for and received one; or
  • A copy of the identity (biographical) page of your passport and copies of all admission and parole stamps in your passport for entries into the United States. Please note that children may be included in a parent’s Ukrainian passport; in such cases, the children’s information will not be on the identity page.

If you submit any document containing information in a foreign language to USCIS, you must include a full English language translation that the translator has certified as complete and accurate and include the translator’s certification that they are competent to translate from the foreign language into English.

Note: If your name is spelled incorrectly on your current EAD based on your initial parole and you have not corrected it, you should submit Form I-131 with the correct spelling of your name. In addition, you will need to submit government-issued evidence, such as a passport, showing the correct spelling of your name. You must also include an English translation of the government-issued evidence if it is a document in a language other than English.

Note: If your name has changed due to marriage, divorce, or another reason, USCIS instructs applicants to file your re-parole application using your current legal name. If this is different than the name on your passport, include a copy of the documentation showing the reason for the name change, such as a court order, marriage certificate, divorce certificate, or other evidence. Also, be sure to include a certified translation of any document containing information in a foreign language.

What Is the Process to Apply for Re-Parole?

To apply for re-parole online under this process, you must submit the following in your USCIS account:

  • Form I-131, Application for Travel Document (completed and signed);
  • Select the option “I am outside the United States, and I am applying for an Advance Parole Document,” even though you are inside the United States and are applying for re-parole;
  • Select “Yes” to the question about applying for re-parole; and
  • If you are helping a minor file for re-parole, list the minor as the applicant; and
  • Include the required documentation and filing fee with your application.

To apply for re-parole by mail using a printed application, you must submit the following:

  • Form I-131, Application for Travel Document (completed and signed);
  • Select item 1.e. in Part 2 to indicate that “I am outside of the United States, and I am applying for Advance Parole Document,” even though you are inside the United States and are applying for re-parole; and
  • Handwrite “Ukraine RE-PAROLE” at the top of the form; and
  • Submit required documentation and filing fee (or fee waiver request) with your application.

If your mailing address is different from your physical address, USCIS indicates you should list your mailing address in the physical address fields to ensure proper delivery of notices and other documents. Currently, Form I-131 only allows individuals to list one address.

If a parent or legal guardian is filling out the information for their child, the parent or legal guardian must also complete the information in the “preparer” section.

After USCIS receives and accepts your Form I-131 for re-parole under this process, USCIS will inform you in writing if you need to attend a biometric services appointment. If USCIS is able to reuse your previously submitted biometrics, you will not receive a biometric services appointment notice.

If you are required to submit new biometrics, USCIS will provide you the location of your designated USCIS application support center and the date and time of your appointment. Note that if you do not attend your biometric services appointment, USCIS may deny your application.

Is There a Fee to Apply for Re-Parole?

As of April 1, 2024, the following are the filing fees for Form I-131, Application for Travel Document:

  • $580 if filing online
  • $630 if filing by mail

Individuals who believe they are eligible for a fee waiver may file Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver (or a written request) with their Form I-131 applications. Along with Form I-912, they must submit the required evidence of their inability to pay the filing fee. Please note: You cannot request a fee waiver if you are applying online. Applicants seeking a fee waiver for re-parole must file their applications by mail.

For more information about fee waivers, visit www.uscis.gov/feewaiver.

Is It Necessary to File a New I-131 Application in Order to Request Re-Parole if an Individual Already Filed Form I-131 to Request an Advance Travel Document?

At this time, USCIS has indicated that they cannot process the same I-131 Form for more than one type of request. USCIS will route a Form I-131 request for re-parole to a separate processing center than a Form I-131 request for an advance travel document. Therefore, individuals who previously filed Form I-131 in order to request an advance travel document must file a new I-131 to apply for re-parole.

How Long Does It Take to Receive Re-Parole, and Can It Be Expedited?

At this time, USCIS is unable to predict how long the processing times will take for a re-parole application. USCIS has indicated that filing online can help reduce processing time in general and will provide faster access to notices. Filing online may also prevent common mistakes that we see with paper filings, which cause unnecessary delays.

USCIS may expedite Form I-131, Application for Travel Document if it meets certain criteria. Note that expedited processing is reserved for certain limited circumstances; you should not rely on it to have a re-parole application approved before your parole expires.

Instructions for expediting a request can be found here:

https://www.uscis.gov/forms/filing-guidance/how-to-make-an-expedite-request

How Can Eligible Parolees Renew their Employment Authorization?

If USCIS approves their application for re-parole, parolees must apply separately for a renewal of an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) in order to maintain their eligibility for employment on the basis of their humanitarian parole. If approved, the new EAD will be valid for the duration of the new period of parole. USCIS encourages parolees to apply for an EAD renewal through their USCIS online account as soon as USCIS approves their re-parole application.

To apply for a new EAD, parolees must file Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, after USCIS approves their re-parole. USCIS indicates that parolees who file a new Form I-765 before they are granted re-parole may deny the new Form I-765 (and will not refund any fees for filing the I-765).

Parolees who have been approved for re-parole but who have not yet been issued a new EAD may be able to show their new Form I-94 (following approved re-parole) as acceptable evidence of identity and employment authorization while their new EAD application is pending. Parolees who have been granted re-parole may use their new Form I-94 for a period of up to 90 days from the date they are hired (or for reverification of employment eligibility when the initial EAD expires). To use the I-94 for this purpose, a parolee must have been:

  • Granted re-parole as a certain Ukrainian citizen or an immediate family member;
  • Have a most recent date of entry on or before September 30, 2023; and
  • Have a new I-94 with “UHP” listed as the class of admission.

Within 90 days, the employee must present an unexpired EAD or unrestricted Social Security card and a List B identity document such as a state-issued driver’s license or identification card to meet the Form I-9 requirements.

An application for an EAD renewal must include either the filing fee for Form I-765 or a completed Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. Individuals who believe they are eligible for a fee waiver may file Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver (or a written request) with their Form I-765 applications. Along with Form I-912, they must submit the required evidence of their inability to pay the filing fee. Please note: You cannot request a fee waiver if you are applying online. Applicants seeking a fee waiver for an EAD renewal must file their applications by mail.

Note: Congress mandated that only Ukrainian citizens and their immediate family members who were paroled between February 24, 2022 and September 30, 2023 are employment-authorized incident to their parole status for the first 90 days of their parole. Those who were paroled starting October 1, 2023 must apply for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) in order to work lawfully, and they must present as evidence of their employment authorization a valid EAD.

What Are the Health Requirements for Uniting for Ukraine Parolees?

As a condition of their parole, Uniting for Ukraine parolees must attest that they have completed all the health requirements for medical screenings and vaccinations in their USCIS online account. These include an attestation that they have completed vaccine requirements (or are eligible for an exception to vaccine requirements) for measles, polio, and COVID-19, as well as an attestation that they will receive a medical screening for tuberculosis after arriving.

Once they are paroled into the United States, Uniting for Ukraine beneficiaries will need to complete a medical attestation in their USCIS accounts within 90 days of arrival. In the post-arrival attestation, beneficiaries must state that they will get tested for Tuberculosis (TB) and receive the second (or remaining) dose of the initial COVID-19 vaccine (if they only received one dose before arrival). Ukrainian new arrivals should arrange for their own Covid-19 vaccinations and medical screening for tuberculosis, but many local or state health departments may be able to provide a TB blood test or refer them to other testing locations.  New arrivals may also be able to get a TB blood test at a health care provider’s office or a local laboratory.

All adults and children at least 2 years old must be screened for TB by getting an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) test within 90 days after arrival to the United States. An IGRA is a blood test to tell if a person has been infected with the TB bacteria. For the TB blood test, a healthcare provider or laboratory technician will draw blood and send it to a laboratory for analysis and results. Only one visit is needed to draw blood for the test, but results can take up to 4 weeks. It is important to know that the IGRA test does not tell whether the person has a latent TB infection or has progressed to TB disease. The test only indicates whether or not the person has been infected with the TB bacteria. Those who have a positive reaction to the TB blood test must get additional testing. The doctor or nurse will perform other tests and may recommend treatment, which may include a chest radiograph, isolation, and TB treatment.

Children under 2 years old who qualify for an exception to the tuberculosis test screening don’t need to get the screening, but they still need to complete the medical attestation within 90 days of arrival. Beneficiaries who test positive for tuberculosis must take the appropriate measures, including additional

A preview of the health attestation page containing the full health requirements can be found here:
https://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/uniting-for-ukraine/uniting-for-ukraine-vaccine-attestation

Additional information on health requirements and services for Uniting for Ukraine parolees can be found on this page under the Health and Safety Resources section.

Note: It is not necessary to submit vaccination records or TB screening results in order to apply for re-parole.

Will Parolees Continue to Qualify for Benefits and Services they Currently Receive?

Eligible Ukrainian citizens/nationals and their eligible family members will continue to qualify for ORR refugee benefits and services if they were paroled into the United States from Feb. 24, 2022, through Sept. 30, 2023. Additionally, the following relatives of ORR-eligible Ukrainian parolees are eligible for ORR refugee benefits and services, even if they were paroled into the United States after Sept. 30, 2023:

  • Spouses or children of ORR-eligible Ukrainian parolees who entered the United States with parole from Feb. 24, 2022, through Sept. 30, 2023. Spouses and children are defined in section 101(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (8 U.S.C. § 1101(b)).
  • Parents, legal guardians, or primary caregivers of an ORR-eligible unaccompanied child from Ukraine who entered the United States with parole from Feb. 24, 2022, through Sept. 30, 2023. An unaccompanied child is defined within 6 U.S.C. § 279(g)(2).

Ukrainian citizens and their immediate family members who meet these requirements will remain eligible for benefits if their parole has not been terminated. Ukrainian citizens who have another ORR-eligible immigration status or category, such as refugee or asylee, are eligible for ORR refugee benefits and services in the standard manner. They do not need to enter within a particular time frame, and their immigration status or category does not affect the duration of their eligibility.

Ukrainian parolees who arrived after September 20, 2023 may not be eligible for ORR refugee benefits and services.

More information on eligibility for ORR benefits can be found in the October 2023 guidance from the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

Parolees will need a Social Security number for employment, to collect Social Security benefits, and to receive other government services. If you did not complete Form I-765 and did not answer “Yes” to both Item Number 14 and Item Number 15 allowing USCIS to disclose your personal information on Form I-765, you will need to apply for a Social Security number and card using the instructions at the Social Security Administration’s Request Social Security number for the first time webpage.

Have You Moved within the United States Since You Were Paroled?

As a condition of your parole, you must update your address with USCIS each time you move and within 10 days of moving. USCIS strongly encourages parolees to change their address through their USCIS online account. This will help ensure they receive all correspondence and benefits from USCIS in a timely manner and avoid possible delays.

Beware of Immigration Scams and Fraud

Don’t become the victim of an immigration scam or fraud! With any new initiative or process, be on alert for anyone asking you for your personal information, to pay for forms, or misleading offers and scam websites. This article contains some guidance on how Ukrainians can identify, avoid, and report immigration scams and fraudulent activities.

Additional Information and Frequently Asked Questions about Ukrainian Re-Parole

For more information on re-parole eligibility, requirements, and procedures, visit the USCIS Re-Parole Process for Certain Ukrainian Citizens and Their Immediate Family Members page here:

https://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/uniting-for-ukraine/re-parole-process-for-certain-ukrainian-citizens-and-their-immediate-family-members

For additional details and questions about Ukrainian Re-Parole, visit the USCIS Frequently Asked Questions about the Re-Parole Process for Certain Ukrainians and their Immediate Family Members page here:

https://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/uniting-for-ukraine/re-parole-process-for-certain-ukrainian-citizens-and-their-immediate-family-members/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-re-parole-process-for-certain-ukrainians-and-their-immediate